Systematic reviews and meta-analyses: a step-by-step guide

Step 2

Who will be involved?

 

It is very difficult to perform a systematic review alone. The highest quality reviews will have input from experts in

  • the subject being reviewed
  • systematic review methodology
  • information retrieval
  • statistics
  • other aspects e.g. health economics if required

Many people in CCACE have already performed systematic reviews/meta-analyses, and may be able to provide informal advice and support (see below). These people are happy to be approached with specific questions or for general pointers not answered here, but be aware that they may not have much time available. Supervisors and collaborators should also be able to help. Contacting a librarian at the early stage of the systematic review is also useful to help identify the extent of the literature and to formulate a search strategy.

Links to contacts:

Susan Shenkin: Systematic reviews of observational studies. Click here

Mike Allerhand: Statistical Methodology. Click here

Geoff Der: Meta-analysis. Click here

Cathie Sudlow: Systematic reviews and meta-analysis of trials and observational studies, methodological advice. Click here

Rustam Al-Shahi Salman: Systematic reviews and meta-analysis of trials and observational studies, methodological advice including graphical presentation of data. Click here

Prof Joanna Wardlaw: methodology of performing and reporting systematic reviews, particularly related to neuroimaging. Click here

Link to published systematic reviews and meta-analyses by CCACE: Click here

 

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